Home: Authors: Judy H. Wright aka Auntie Artichoke
Family Relationship Coach, Author & International Speaker

Status: Member since October 20, 2008
Location: United States of America
Articles: 162 Active Articles, resulting in 66198 views
Feedback: 17 comments on these 162 articles

TRCB - Member Profile - Judy H. Wright aka Auntie Artichoke

Who is Judy H. Wright aka Auntie Artichoke, the storytelling trainer? And What's with the Artichoke?

Judy is a parent educator, family coach, and personal historian who has written more than 20 books, hundreds of articles and speaks internationally on family issues, including care giving.

Trained as a ready to learn consultant, she works with Head Start organizations and child care resource centers. She also volunteers time writing end-of-life stories for Hospice. She and Dwain, her husband of 40 years, have six grown children and seven grandchildren.  They consider their greatest success in life that their children like themselves and each other.                             

The symbol of the artichoke has great meaning for Judy in her teaching and writing.  As she works with families, she sees that frequently only the outer edges are exposed and can be prickly and sometimes bitter to the taste.  But, as you expose the artichoke and people to warmth, caring, and time, gradually the leaves begin to open and expose the real treasure-the heart.

The artichoke also became a teaching lesson when Judy, with her young family, moved into military housing in California to find Artichokes in their yard.  Given that it takes two years for the vegetable to flower, the original gardener never got to see the seeds of her labor.  Many times, our actions and reactions in life are felt by people we will never meet, but we plant the seeds of kindness anyway.

You will enjoy Judy's approachable manner, wonderful storytelling and common-sense solutions gleaned from working with hundreds of families and organizations just like yours. Your encounter with Judy will leave you feeling inspired, entertained and especially motivated. Visit Judy's website for excellent references and a full listing of books, workshop topics, tele-classes and testimonials.

To make arrangements for your group or organization to enjoy having Judy present a keynote address, workshop or training session, please visit my websites given below.

If you are like most parents, grandparents, teachers today, you probably think that children are watching way too much television today. Not only are they sitting on their rear ends inside, when you can get them outside, they are playing video games on their cell-phones or other electronics. So, not only are they not getting sufficient exercises and breathing clean air, they are also becoming more and more isolated from each other and the family.
Even though 10% or more of reported deaths are unexpected and traumatic, you are still blindsided when it happens to those you love and care about. It is not something that one ever plans on and so are not only grieving emotionally, but have no idea on what to do in order to handle the practical aspects of death.
Comfort care means COMFORT, not cure. Our scientific and medical cultures are trained and geared toward cure, treatment, and results. Medical personnel want to fix people and find answers. Some will feel that somehow they have failed their calling if they do not keep searching and attempting to find a "cure." It is often difficult to move from this modality into comfort care only.
What do children really need besides food, shelter and protection? Have you ever wondered what your responsibility is to ensure that your child will grow up to be a contributing member of society? As a mom, foster mom and grandmother as well as a family educator and relationship coach, I have learned a few things about what children really need. Surprise, it is not the latest toy or name brand clothing.
When two people are just starting a relationship, they do their best to present only their best and most attractive attributes to the other party. For the relationship to continue to evolve both want to feel appreciated, admired, validated and wanted.
Children need fathers. No matter how old the child is or how bad the relationship has been in the past. If you, as a father, have relinquished the reins of guidance because of absence you need to step back into the picture. Many men are uncomfortable mentoring, guiding, teaching and yes, loving their own children. they assume that the step-dad, teacher or coach will step in to teach their sons the ways of male-dom.
Families often struggle with the need to be sure everything has been done that can be done their terminally ill loved one. It can be very difficult for the patient and family members as they transition from making decisions toward cure to making decisions that will help to allow for a comfortable and peaceful death.
The family is the foundation of life. It is the basic organization and where family members learn what is expected of them in life and their part in the scheme of things.
Leopold Mozart maneuvered his son all over the world showing him off and forcing his way into places that would advance the career of his son. Joseph P. Kennedy began grooming Jack F. for the American presidency when his oldest Joe Jr. was killed in World War II.
As a parent educator and family relationship coach, I work with families just like yours and mine all over the world. When I asked participants in my parenting classes what they do when they are angry or stressed, they say that they yell, swear, throw a shoe or other object or threaten their kids with a punishment.
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