Home: Authors: Judy H. Wright aka Auntie Artichoke
Family Relationship Coach, Author & International Speaker

Status: Member since October 20, 2008
Location: United States of America
Articles: 162 Active Articles, resulting in 68753 views
Feedback: 17 comments on these 162 articles

TRCB - Member Profile - Judy H. Wright aka Auntie Artichoke

Who is Judy H. Wright aka Auntie Artichoke, the storytelling trainer? And What's with the Artichoke?

Judy is a parent educator, family coach, and personal historian who has written more than 20 books, hundreds of articles and speaks internationally on family issues, including care giving.

Trained as a ready to learn consultant, she works with Head Start organizations and child care resource centers. She also volunteers time writing end-of-life stories for Hospice. She and Dwain, her husband of 40 years, have six grown children and seven grandchildren.  They consider their greatest success in life that their children like themselves and each other.                             

The symbol of the artichoke has great meaning for Judy in her teaching and writing.  As she works with families, she sees that frequently only the outer edges are exposed and can be prickly and sometimes bitter to the taste.  But, as you expose the artichoke and people to warmth, caring, and time, gradually the leaves begin to open and expose the real treasure-the heart.

The artichoke also became a teaching lesson when Judy, with her young family, moved into military housing in California to find Artichokes in their yard.  Given that it takes two years for the vegetable to flower, the original gardener never got to see the seeds of her labor.  Many times, our actions and reactions in life are felt by people we will never meet, but we plant the seeds of kindness anyway.

You will enjoy Judy's approachable manner, wonderful storytelling and common-sense solutions gleaned from working with hundreds of families and organizations just like yours. Your encounter with Judy will leave you feeling inspired, entertained and especially motivated. Visit Judy's website for excellent references and a full listing of books, workshop topics, tele-classes and testimonials.

To make arrangements for your group or organization to enjoy having Judy present a keynote address, workshop or training session, please visit my websites given below.

Is there a difference between lazy and unmotivated? Why do some children move as if in slow motion? Is this normal or are they just trying to irritate you? You may be surprised to learn that a great many factors come into play when a child appears to be lazy; stage of growth, hormones, hunger, motivation, lack of clear directions and maybe even sleep deprivation.
Having been a parent educator and a PBS consultant for Ready to Learn for many years, I have had the unique opportunity to work with Head Start families, Child Care Providers, and parents as well as schools, organizations, and teachers all over the world just like you.
Early childhood educators have called play “children’s work”. Many parents believe their children should be doing something more productive than merely having fun. But, actually, play fosters physical, emotional, intellectual and social development. Encouraging your child to play is vital for his development as well as his happiness.
Loving your step-child can be both simple and hard. It is not enough for parents, step parents and extended family to feel a deep glow of love for the children in your circle of influence. You must convey that feeling into a message that is heard, felt and integrated by the child. Children need to be told both verbally and non-verbally how much they are valued for just being them.
It is good to remember a family is an organization. In fact, it is the basic organization of society. This is just one of the reasons I am such a proponent of family meetings. You wouldn’t think of running a successful business without a plan, goal setting meetings, team building sessions and clear missions and expectations. As such, everyone in the family should have an equivalent of a job description. Each person’s job description helps him define his roles and responsibilities in the family.
Are there ideas churning in your mind waiting for just the right time to get them down on paper? Do you have a unique perspective on a subject or problem facing many people? Do you read a book or article and think, “I could write better than that?” Have you ever said “someday, when I have time, I am going to write a book?”
Know your limits. Accept what you can’t change and let go of things out of your control.
Increasing evidence suggests that rich stimulation early in life affects the intellectual development of children. Children need as much encouragement as possible to try new tasks. They also need to learn from doing. Only in this way can they come to know about their surroundings and how they will be personally affected by them.
In America, Thanksgiving traditionally means family, friends and especially food. We cook and eat as if there was a scarcity of turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy, stuffing and creamy vegetables. We dive into pumpkin pie as if there was a national law that says it can only be served and eaten one day a year.
Some years ago, our family was going through a tough time. We had suffered lots of financial, medical and emotional stress. It became so overwhelming that we approached an older man from our church for counsel.
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