Home: Authors: Judy H. Wright aka Auntie Artichoke
Family Relationship Coach, Author & International Speaker

Status: Member since October 20, 2008
Location: United States of America
Articles: 162 Active Articles, resulting in 68769 views
Feedback: 17 comments on these 162 articles

TRCB - Member Profile - Judy H. Wright aka Auntie Artichoke

Who is Judy H. Wright aka Auntie Artichoke, the storytelling trainer? And What's with the Artichoke?

Judy is a parent educator, family coach, and personal historian who has written more than 20 books, hundreds of articles and speaks internationally on family issues, including care giving.

Trained as a ready to learn consultant, she works with Head Start organizations and child care resource centers. She also volunteers time writing end-of-life stories for Hospice. She and Dwain, her husband of 40 years, have six grown children and seven grandchildren.  They consider their greatest success in life that their children like themselves and each other.                             

The symbol of the artichoke has great meaning for Judy in her teaching and writing.  As she works with families, she sees that frequently only the outer edges are exposed and can be prickly and sometimes bitter to the taste.  But, as you expose the artichoke and people to warmth, caring, and time, gradually the leaves begin to open and expose the real treasure-the heart.

The artichoke also became a teaching lesson when Judy, with her young family, moved into military housing in California to find Artichokes in their yard.  Given that it takes two years for the vegetable to flower, the original gardener never got to see the seeds of her labor.  Many times, our actions and reactions in life are felt by people we will never meet, but we plant the seeds of kindness anyway.

You will enjoy Judy's approachable manner, wonderful storytelling and common-sense solutions gleaned from working with hundreds of families and organizations just like yours. Your encounter with Judy will leave you feeling inspired, entertained and especially motivated. Visit Judy's website for excellent references and a full listing of books, workshop topics, tele-classes and testimonials.

To make arrangements for your group or organization to enjoy having Judy present a keynote address, workshop or training session, please visit my websites given below.

Tell me something you like about yourself? Help your child to focus on her many strengths.
Many families, ours included, have learned that breakfast is eaten after we are dressed and have made our beds.
Incest is sexual activity, ranging from fondling to intercourse, between family members who aren’t married to one another. State laws vary regarding the type of sexual activity and also on what constitutes the type of kinship that indicates incest rather than just sexual abuse.
To have reasonable expectations of our children is an important aspect of wise parenting. Reasonable expectations leave room for a child to be a child but understand they are on the road to learning to be a mature adult.
What one word best sums up summer fun? Water. I bet your favorite memories as a child involved getting wet, running through sprinklers on a sweltering afternoon, water fights in the backyard, wading at the beach, playing on the slip & slide, and skipping rocks across the river. Your kids will relish the same experiences if they share them with you.
Our children judge themselves on the opinions we have of them. When we use harsh words, demeaning adjectives or a sarcastic tone of voice, we literally strip a child’s core of self-confidence and make them less likely to try to please us.
Get down from the table top right now! What are you doing? Floors are for standing on, tables are for eating. You need a time out, young lady. You go to your room and think about how you have been acting today.
Many families today are blending members from past relationships. It would be easy to give up when faced with all the conflicting methods of parenting and discipline that come to a family who has joined forces together.
How many times do I have to tell you to clean your room? Why should a child keep his room neat? Many children say they don’t care whether it is neat or dirty, so why should it matter to anyone else?
Successful parents have learned to be both firm and kind at the same time. They set boundaries and work with their children to help them understand that they will follow through with appropriate action if inappropriate behavior continues. Don’t think when I say firmness that I really mean strictness. Strictness deals with the child; firmness is more an extension of our resolve toward our decisions.
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