How to Set Up Your Own Home Art Studio

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Every creative person craves their own studio, a special place to feel inspired, and to produce masterpieces. Many artists believe that such a place is only a dream. They think a home art studio is too expensive, or unrealistic. However, with some forethought and planning, a home studio can be created, and without blowing your savings!

First, you must decide exactly what your studio will be used for and how much you have to spend. Different styles and forms of art have different requirements. Painting and sculpting are potentially messier than pencil work or pen and inks. A firm budget from the beginning will allow you to obtain the most important parts of the studio without wasting money on wants rather than needs.

Now you are ready to design your studio! Start with an analysis of the space. Make sure you have enough room to move around a little without feeling cramped. If your art has the potential to ruin carpet, you will need a space with a floor of hardwood, linoleum, tiles, or concrete. If this is not possible, invest in plastic or vinyl floor covering. Consider using floor runners or even a strong shower curtain.

Decide what you want the walls to look like. Would you prefer a white blank slate, or would you be inspired by the art of others? Painting a room is too much of a hassle to postpone this step, so really think about what you would like.

Some art forms will require easy access to a sink for mixing and cleaning. If this is the case for your situation, make sure the sink is one that will not be ruined by paints or clay. If this is not possible, consider some "outside the box" solutions, such as glass jars of paint thinner or plastic buckets for water and bar towels for wiping.

Next, you must consider lighting. Some artists swear by natural light. For them, large, unobstructed windows are a necessity. Other artists prefer full-spectrum artificial light. These bulbs are available at most hardware stores, and will allow you to work regardless of the time.

The next step is getting suitable furniture. Do you need a flat table? Perhaps you need a tilted table, or an easel. Also, what type of chair do you need? Would you prefer a tall stool or a padded chair? Your workspace should feel comfortable and easily accessible. Art is hard enough to create without back pain!

Finally, how are you going to organize and store your supplies? You can use shelves against the walls, bins with labels, or drawers full of pencils and pens. However you organize, it should make sense to you, even if no one else can understand your system. Also, do not worry about purchasing a full organizational system. Shelves and drawers come in many different forms. Take a walk through the hardware section of the local super center. Consider pieces from the flea market or a yard sale. Any flat surface can be bracketed to a wall and turned into a shelf. If the piece is the right size and shape for your needs, then you can make it work!


Ricky Dean is a professional article writer for Dinosauric.com. For more art painting tips, visit www.dinosauric.com/arts-crafts/painting.

 

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