Motivating Workers Using the SCOPE Principles of Business Leadership

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In most companies, workers are hired for a specific position where they are given the expectations of the job and details of what they will be performing day to day. However, in today's culture, with downsizing, rightsizing or whatever you want to call it many workers are taking on multiple tasks, many that are not detailed in their job description. How do you motivate those employees to remain at your company and work to their potential? I am going to let you in on a little known secret that many business leaders may not want to hear.

In the corporate environment, the premise is that CEO's and Presidents tell others what to do and expect them to do it without question. Unfortunately, this antiquated concept does not work with all workers. Management's goal is to find what motivates workers so they work to their potential. Sure increases in pay and promotions are great motivation for a job well done. However, to motivate a worker to perform to the best of their ability on a regular basis, employers need to do small things to show appreciation for their subordinates. For example, if an employee conducts research for something you needed, ask about their sources and how came to choose them. Then take a few minutes while they proudly explain their answer.

You may think, what can this do? The answer is plenty for the morale of that worker. By asking then listening to them about their work, you are giving their work validation, showing appreciation and motivating them in the future to work harder all without even having to say the words thank you. (Though those words are always a nice addition) Result is a self- motivated worker that becomes intrinsically motivated to perform better at least for a while. The next assignment they are given they will most likely take to readily with drive and a sense of purpose. Do not think you have to say something every time a subordinate completes a project. Showing interest every time will lose its effectiveness if you use it too much. Maybe just the thumbs up sign or a simple "great" when they give you the assignment they have been working on can do wonders for their esteem. The simple acknowledgement of a subordinates work will earn you respect as well.  Get to know them as a person as well as a worker. 

It is good advice for supervisors to review their subordinate's job description on a regular basis and take note if you see that they are going above their job duties and taking on additional responsibilities. This is especially true in small to medium sized business where it is more likely that individuals will pull together to get things done especially if there are open positions. Since many companies are unable to fill positions right after an employee leaves and the existing workers are required to take up the slack. When you see that a worker has done more than their share, voice your appreciation of their extra efforts. They will feel appreciated and be intrinsically motivated to continue doing more for the company.

As a business leader, you need to remember that a self motivated worker works harder for you making your job easier.  Their drive will also help the company run smoother. Remind your division heads of the importance of making the effort to recognize their subordinates work effort.  Encourage them to take interest in their workers.You will be surprised at how this inexpensive small effort will help your whole company benefit.  Discuss ways to show appreciation for a job well done.  You might be surprised to see the positive influence this will have on morale and productivity.

SCOPE Principles of Business Interactions

How do you motivate employees? The answer I hear ranges from nothing to pay raises for performance. What if I told you that there are things you can do to raise the morale of your team that will motivate them to work harder for the company and it will cost you little to nothing. This can be especially critical when you have budget reduction and tough economic times force you to cut cost.

Learning how to improve an employee'sSelf Motivation will have them working harder for you and the company and these techniques will improve the morale of the entire company if used correctly.  This leads to increased earnings for your company.

Be Creative in your approach to business. Look at old ideas and put a new twist to freshen your approach with your customers as well as staff. You will be surprised at how a new approach will inspire thinking that is more creative

Organization in planning sessions is crucial for success. It reduces wasted time so you make progress quickly.

Professionalism is a key aspect of any organization and applies to everyone from the top down. No matter what type of business you are in professionalism is key to successful interactions inside and outside the walls of your business.

Always be Eager to learn. No matter how long you have been in a field or how much you have studied you can always learn from others. Look for ideas in the most unlikely places and people.

 The SCOPE Principles Work for all businesses from Fortune 500 to small Nonprofits.

Sheryl Monteil has worked extensively in the non- profit sector for the past 13 years.  She has a degree in Psychology with the emphasis in Rehabilitation studies.  Sheryl's interests include self improvement and physical health.  She strives to help non- profits further their mission by working with them to set company goals and boost staff morale.  She is passionate about upholding workers rights and assisting management in learning how to motivate workers and improve productivity by using the SCOPE Principles of Business Leadership. 
Follow her on twitter  
http://twitter.com/2352mont

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