PVC Pipe Manufacturers: Choosing A Distributor

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You may be familiar with the term PVC, especially in relation to things like construction, the most common form being PVC pipes. But, do you know anything else about the material, or how much is made and how much we've come to rely on it? Well PVC Pipe Manufacturing is a practice that has been continually improving for decades, as well as the entire PVC industry. First of all, PVC is an acronym for polyvinyl chloride, and in raw form can be morphed into many products with long shelf lives and reasonable prices. You can find the material PVC in things that you wouldn't even think would hold it, like ceiling tiles, portable electronics, and signs that you see on the street. Over time, PVC has taken a huge lead in plastics manufacturing, and with its easy flexibility and manufacturing process, there's really no surprise why. It is even approximated that by 2016, production of PVC will exceed at least 40 million tons, looking at our current output.

As can be expected, PVC is made up of a vinyl polymer, consisting of dense groups of vinyl known as ethenyls. The chemical structure of the vinyl groups change, allowing for one of the vinyl's hydrogen groups to be replaced with chloride. After the discovery of plasticizing PVC, or adding additives in order to make the material more flexible, the applications for the material increased tenfold. This plasticizing was largely responsible for why it climbed to the third most widely used plastic in America.

So many more products were able to be constructed in such a short period of time, and in huge quantities, since the discovery of plasticization of the polymer. Hoses, electrical cable insulation, and even fabrics are constructed with the use of polyvinyl chloride. Many different plasticizers are employed in the process, but the most likely one to be used by a manufacturer is phthalates. Due to the fact that this plasticized PVC is is so flexible and durable at the same time, things like inflatable pool toys and waterbeds.

Before PVC can become PVC, it must go through a complex series of steps including an industrial-sized machine and the help of several experts in the field. A VCM, or vinyl chloride monomer, is placed through a process called suspension polymerization. The raw materials are heated and formed to the specifications of the manufacturers. The plastic must then go through a cooling process, as it may lose its form if not cooled properly, thus creating PVC.

PVC was discovered by accident at least two different times during the 19th century; once in 1835 by Henry victor Regnault, and again in 1872 by Eugen Baumann. They found that when they left raw vinyl chloride monomer out in the sun, white chunks began to form along the inside of it. Neither men did anything with what they found however, and the process was not able to expand until the 20th century. Ivan Omstromislensky and Klatte attempted to manipulate the plastic but found it too impossible to work with.

Waldo Semon and the B.F. Goodrich Company came up with the idea of plasticizing the material with the use of different additives. They thought that this would dilute the material and make it more flexible and much easier to work with, and they were right. With the introduction of this plasticizing process in 1926, PVC was allowed to flourish at a completely new level. All of the different applications that were now made possible thanks to plasticization grew in huge demand, and companies had to step it up.

Half of all polyvinyl chloride material produced goes to the making of PVC pipes. These pipes have completely taken over industries such as the water distribution market and the sanitary sewer construction. The durability of these pipes allows them to be put through harsh conditions without cracking or breaking for long periods of time. Also, with a simple heating or concrete process, companies can connect several lengths of pipes together, cutting back on prices, saving time, and allowing PVC piping to run for miles underground.

There's no doubt that PVC piping is completely essential to our way of lives; just think, where you're sitting right now (in your house, job, etc.) there is probably miles of PVC just underneath your feet. When you go about your daily life after today, just try and think about how many of the things you pass that are made out of PVC. Things like racing stripes on the sides of vehicles and advertising signs are made from this incredibly versatile plastic. PVC can be flattened and cut to make thin things like this by a computer-controlled machine!

 

So much PVC pipe manufacturing goes on around us and we either don't notice, or we just don't choose to. Just because we have nothing to do with the installation of PVC pipes doesn't mean we wouldn't be lost without them. Plastic companies deserve way credit than is given to them!

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