Hydrogen Cars?

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In recent days. The idea of a hydrogen powered car, typically abbreviated to hydrogen cars made their debut in California. Critics position was this was more of a marketing gimmick than any time soon seeing hydrogen cars as a reality.

The issue with a hydrogen car is not so much a lack of infrastructure as the cost of producing the hydrogen in the first place. A news item from the EE Times suggests the old adage: "where there's a will there's a way" is true. Two separate developments from MIT suggest that hydrogen cars could be a reality much sooner than anyone previously envisioned.

The first step was the announcement from MIT of "paint on" solar cells. In this brief article I won't go into the details of how the painted solar cells connect to a hard physical metal such as copper. For now, let's just say they do, using conventional solar cells as the interface between the copper in the painted on solar cells.

This gives us solar power at considerably lower cost per watt. Then we are currently doing. However, the really exciting news is the second development announced by MIT.

As you probably know, water is made up of hydrogen and oxygen. Hydrogen put in an engine can create a heckuva lot of energy, when a spark allows the hydrogen to recombine with the oxygen out of the air to drive the Pistons in the engine.

Of course, the byproduct is not harmful pollutants, instead the byproduct is water. Naturally, this makes hydrogen fuel cells for cars, everyone's dream.

So we have with MIT's previous announcement, the solar energy to theoretically use water to get the hydrogen at a lower cost than previously possible from solar cells. The challenge was the electrolysis process. Up until now, it used nickel oxide catalysts to boost the efficiency of the electrolysis process. Due to corrosion problems, the catalysts using the nickel oxide were expensive because they had to be in hermetically sealed water containers.

MIT has a patented liquid catalysts that is added to the water, prior to electrolysis. Almost unbelievably. Their research is is claiming almost 100% efficiency. Equally astounding is the fact that the formulation of the catalysts can be used in inexpensive open containers.

The upshot of this is, thanks to MIT we have a much lower cost solar cells to generate the electricity for making the hydrogen. And now with inexpensive and environmentally friendly "green" electrolysis, which needs nothing more than its patented formulation based on dissolving cobalt phosphate into water, electricity and hydrogen power would be availalable 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

The "super-cheap" electroylzers combined with lower cost solar electricty combine super "green" energy, which when consumed have the by-product we started with  -- water.

Hydrogen could even be used for air travel! If you travel as much as Tcat Houser, his Internet based travel agency, http://www.travel4roadwarriors.com may or may not be your best deal. Tcat maintains the site for his own purposes in looking for the lowest costs for his own travel needs.

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