The Day the Music Died. Yahoo Music Store Closing

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If anyone needed more proof that DRM (Digital Rights Management) was a bad idea in the first place, you've come to the right article. The Yahoo Music Store is going away, forever. The demise of Yahoo Music Store, follows on the heels of MSN Music as well is Sony's Music Connect, may they rest in peace. Quoting the rather unnerving e-mail from Yahoo. We have:

"After September 30, 2008, you will not be able to transfer songs to unauthorized computers or re-license these songs after changing operating systems. Please note that your purchased tracks will generally continue to play on your existing authorized computers unless there is a change to the computer's operating system."

So let's look a little closer at the supposedly reassuring words, we get from Yahoo and their music store.

  • You can move the music you purchased beginning October 1.
  • The music you did pay for, "generally" should continue to play as long as your computer stays working and you don't change operating systems.

I have commented elsewhere in TRCB about Hollywood, Inc. That it has tactics that are straight out of the playbook for Mafia, Inc. I'm going to add another evil villain to the play. Enter, Microsoft!

Anybody with a pulse has at least heard that Vista bites. Often the blame for not being able to get out of its own way is the Aero Video interface, making it more like a MAC. Sorry, the villain is once again, DRM.

The tecnical side is explained in a simple overview from Intel with:

The Trusted Platform Module is a component on the desktop board that is specifically designed to enhance platform security above-and-beyond the capabilities of today's software by providing a protected space for key operations and other security critical tasks. Using both hardware and software, the TPM protects encryption and signature keys at their most vulnerable stages - operations when the keys are being used unencrypted in plain-text form.

I'll save you the geek speak details and simply say that Vista uses a great deal of your computing horsepower to, many times a second, play policeman, making sure you haven't gone to great lengths to steal a song or movie. Microsoft has a great deal of code using TPM.

I don't steal, and I'm not willing to pay for all the overhead to make sure I don't. So I stay with XP. The day Microsoft ceases to put out its regular patches for XP, I'll turn it off. I'm reasonably happy with my Mac. I'm watching Linux grow up. The industry trends towards using open source are getting faster, due to shrinking budgets.

Here's is hoping that Hollywood Inc and Microsoft wake up. Customers expect to get what they paid for. "Renting" music or movies that go away when the seller no longer wants to honor its end of the deal isn't going to fly.

Maybe if folks read the long legal stuff that says Microsoft reserves the right to turn off what you have recorded from TV, downloaded, or thought you bought (you didn't your really renting and they can evict at will), maybe the amazing success of Apple's iTunes store will slow down. Apple gets it. They offer content without DRM.

Maybe if we take a line from Howard Beale in the movie, Network, which goes: "I'm mad as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore!" will let the thugs know this isn't working for any of us or for that matter, them.

As I have pointed out elsewhere at TRCB, I make my living creating content. I like getting paid for my work as much as anyone else. I don't use DRM because it doesn't work.

 The full email from Yahoo Music Store can be found at here.  

 

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