Bits & Bytes

  • Print Article |
  • Send to a Friend |
  • |
  • Add to Google |

Tim Berners-Lee announced the creation of the World Wide Web Foundation which is meant to bring the Web to everyone in the World. Berners-Lee, the father of the internet, has an extremely ambitious project on his hands this time. The president and CEO of Knight Foundation, has announced a five-million dollar seed grant to support the mission.

According to the new foundation's website, it "seeks to advance One Web that is free and open, to expand the Web's capability and robustness, and to extend the Web's benefits to all people on the planet. The Web Foundation brings together business leaders, technology innovators, academia, government, NGOs, and experts in many fields to tackle challenges that, like the Web, are global in scale."

Berners-Lee says the internet needs to have a long reach and greater accessibility to satisfy the needs of people all over the world. Father inter also says that he wants people in the most remote village to feel his "pride" (his nickname for the internet). Father Internet's new project aims to have "humanity connected".

Villagers in India or Africa might not have food, water, shelter or safety, but at least they'll have the internet.

Google recently released Chrome, a new browser that they claim will drive the future of internet applications. Chrome itself is designated to become more of an operating system than a browser. Why I say this is more than just because of the way it has been developed. Developers working on Chrome have made it clear that this browser has to be capable of more than what current browsers have been so far.

To start with, there's the whole sandboxing of tabs and careful memory management. It's true; the browser actually comes with its own task manager. Users can close each tab or window, or even a component or plug-in within a tab, without affecting other tabs or the rest of the browser. Sounds quite similar to the way an operating system should function, doesn't it?

They there's the fact that it will handle the memory management within its own space; it has a new virtual machine for optimized JavaScript handling (as current JavaScript VMs tend to be slow), and even a complete privacy mode that handles all the after session cleanup for users. All of this just reeks of OS functionality. And why not? After all, hasn't everyone who's anyone in the IT world concurred to the fact that rich internet applications are the future (see last month's issue).

So what better application exists to operate these applications in than an operating system! It's not hard to see where Google is going with the launch of their "browser" now, is it?

For more information about how Chrome is designed to work, visit the Chrome webcomic at Google Books then flip to page 68 after the break to see how Google's Chrome does in our review.

True to earlier predictions, the Apple App Store is apparently rejecting useful applications made for the iPhone. Independent iPhone application developer Angelo Dinardi developed an application called MailWrangler for the iPhone and submitted the software to Apple's App Store. Mailwrangler allows users to log in to multiple Gmail accounts, view mails as hreads, pick up Gmail contacts, archive, and "star" messages - features which are lacking in the iPhone's default Mail app.

Yet, the response Dinardi received when his application was rejected was that his application was rejected was that his software "duplicates the functionality of the built-in iPhone application Mail"

Dinardi complained about the misstep on Apple's part in overlooking his product stating that he may as well "just write another flashlight of glowstick application to actually get published. That's the only apps Apple seems to want in the store."

This is not an isolated incident either. Other applications that had been rejected from the App Store include Podcaster and NetShare, both of which also offer additional functionality that the iPhone lacks by default and that complies with Apple's attitude of retaining control. Podcaster allows users to send out and receive podcasts from their iPhone and NetShare gives iPhone the functionality of being used as a modern for other devices.

Apple had this reply for rejecting Podcaster: "Since Podcaster assists in the distribution of podcasts, it duplicates the functionality of the Podcast section of iTunes."

Masroor manages the SourceONE, marketing and content manager in a global marketing field. If you would like to know more about email marketing or if you are looking for service providers in this domain, please contact us at www.mahaan.net. I can give you a list and comparison of some good companies providing affordable online marketing solutions. 

Rate this Article:
  • Article Word Count: 703
  • |
  • Total Views: 133
  • |
  • permalink
  • Print Article |
  • Send to a Friend |
  • |
  • Add to Google |
>