How to Microsoft Access Creating Calculated Fields?

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This is the first article of the sequence about Microsoft Access for the Business Environment. The main hub of this chain is an examination of business uses for the MS Access relational database management system. This series is designed to provide guidance in our usage of practical application of data and database concepts to meet the specific needs of our business world. The mainly of the articles I am going to post will be utilized by MS Access 2002 version, many of the concepts that we share in the series could be apply to many versions of MS Access.

To get the most out of the MS Access for the Business Environment series, you will need to have installed MS Access 2002 in your computer, the majority of the concepts we use will probably apply to earlier versions. Make sure that the PC that you plan to use meets the system requirements to install the Microsoft office, including hardware and operating systems, of MS Access, as well.

Introduction to MS Access Tutorial
This tutorial will introduce calculated fields in MS Access. We can use calculated fields both in queries and tables; here, we will focus upon the creation and use in general. This lesson will include:
• A detailed introduction of calculated fields;
• An introduction of MS Access Expression Builder;
• A practical walkthrough of the process of creating a calculated field.

The reasons we might want to create a calculated field and how such components can help us to enhance the power of our Access databases usage.

Calculated Fields
Many times we face a use to design of a database where calculated fields are useful. The most common scenario environs fields that contain derived data - that is, fields that are made up of data that already exists elsewhere in the database. An example might be the net price of a product that an organization sells, after discounts. A table under consideration might house the retail price and the discount information, but the net price, or retail price less the discount, is a derived amount. We can more efficiently meet a business need for the net price by installing a calculated field that would provide the information as needed.

Expression Builder to Create Calculated Fields
Open the Northwind sample database, and begin by creating a basic calculated field. We will use the Expression Builder, which can often assist us in the creation of expressions when we are learning about expressions, and perhaps Access, in general. We could also enter the expressions directly, if we were certain of the syntax required and how to add it, but for now, we will use the Expression Builder.

We will start Access and proceed, taking the steps in our next tutorial of Part II:

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