Canon SD Series Lens Barrier Cover Repair: You Can do it Yourself

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Many people have asked about repairing their front covers/flaps on their Canon PowerShot SD series cameras, so I've written up some instructions. The barrier kit on most Canon PowerShot SD series cameras is a little tricky but not impossible to replace yourself.

All you need is some patience, a steady hand and a small tipped screwdriver. We use dental picks, they work great! To start, you will need to turn on the camera and extend the lens, then open the battery door to turn off the camera and keep the lens out. This allows you to easily work on the lens barrier assembly.

The first part that goes in is the barrel drive ring; it has a small part sticking down into the lens. Some cameras don't have one, so if there isn't one in your kit then your camera doesn't need it. Make sure it rotates slightly once it has been inserted, otherwise its not in properly and will jam the lens.

Next are the springs and flaps. Put one spring on each of the flaps, there are little tabs to hold them on. They are TINY, they are hard to hold and if you drop it... lets just say DON'T drop it on the carpet, ok? We do have just the springs available for purchase, but please try not to lose them.

Gently put the flap in the hole with the spring laying towards the post that the free end will mount on; then with something with a very small tip (we use dental picks) gently grab the loop of the spring and stick it on its post.

Do this with the flaps in the open position, they will stay in place if you get them seated properly. If everything pops off, just start again. Try not to stretch out the springs, they need to remain tight for the assembly to work properly.

Then gently put on the barrier cover, it's a flat plastic ring. There are tabs on the barrier cover, they match up with little slots on the lens and it locks into place. Be gentle, don't force anything too hard or you will break it and the parts will not hold it place.

Now it's time to test your skills! Put in the battery (cross your fingers) and press the power button! Did it work? Did it go *SPROING!* and all the parts flew across the room? Yeah I hope not, but I've been there myself so you're not alone.

Once you have it working smoothly:

Next put the dual sided tape on the barrier cover. VERY IMPORTANT: Peel the tape off the yellow backing paper but DO NOT remove the paper from the side that is cut to match the shape of the tape!! Removing the small paper part will cause the tape to fold up on itself and stick together. Bye bye tape!

The tabs fold over the edge, don't let them stick out or the lens cover won't fit and the lens will jam. The arrow in the image above shows the tape tabs folded down in the correct spot. The tape lines up with one tab at about the 11 o'clock position, then fold the tabs over and press them in so they don't stick out.

Now put on your chrome or black lens cap, line up the cap with the small indentation at the bottom, you'll see how it goes on easily.

Fire up the camera again and admire your handywork! Congratulations you repaired your camera yourself for $20 and the good old Geek Squad told you it would be $200 and take 3-4 weeks to repair.

Hmm... I think I'm seeing the beginning of something big here; affordable digital camera repair!

Thomas owns an online digital camera repair shop in Burnsville, MN. http://www.darntoothysam.com. The business name is an anagram of his full name; Thomas Drayton.

Darntoothysam.com specializes in making camera repair affordable by consistanly charging half or less than what others quote for the same repair for all brands of digital cameras.

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