Learning About Potential Employees Is Easy

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When it comes to reasons for why background checks are conducted, there are several different rationales given by employers. In some cases, a background check may be needed when the employee is going to require a security clearance of one sort or another. This is generally the most common reason given for checks when government employers are looking to hire people.

These days, though, just as many civilian employers as government employers are conducting background checks, and for a variety of purposes. The most common reason seems to have to do with resumes. Employers want to verify first of all that the resume is factual and accurate.

This is because is has been shown that up to 50% of all resumes will contain serious errors. Not surprisingly, employers do not want to hire employees who supply embellished or inaccurate resumes.

In this case most typical background checks examine an employee's past work history and any college education or other education being claimed by the employee. This may be used as a basis to be more competitive for the job being offered. There have been numerous cases where employees have claimed education or prior work experience that they never actually obtained.

When it comes to background checks, employers must follow federal government rules and regulations for such checks, as these are considered in a legal sense to be consumer reports. Because they are consumer reports, there are only certain aspects of a person’s background that can be examined. Additionally, employees must be notified in writing that such an examination is going to be conducted.

Once that notification has been given, the employer must secure the permission of the prospective employee in writing before conducting the examination. Also, if the employer decides not to hire the prospective employee based on the results of the background check, the employee must be notified through a pre-adverse action disclosure letter and a copy of the employee's rights in the matter must be supplied.

The information that is contained within a background check is also varied. At a minimum a background check will at least verify the prospective employee's social security number. Other checks that are more thorough in nature will look into past work history, people who know the employee, credit histories, and also any criminal history under certain carefully outlined circumstances.

It is the case these days that more employers than ever before are using an Employee Background Check to gauge the hiring suitability of a prospective employee. Therefore, the information a prospective employee has about what and how a Background Check is conducted can go a long way to easing the concerned he or she might have when being notified that such a check will in fact be taking place.

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