Elongated Coin Collectibles

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The elongated coin, is an inexpensive collectible or souvenir that people may pick up on vacation and entertainment locations including museums, famous landmarks, theme parks, amusement parks, zoos, aquariums, gift shops, game rooms, online shopping, etc.

These collectibles are also created by personal engravers who make special-issue elongated coins to commemorate special personal events, such as a birth or a marriage, and other important events that warranting personal celebrations. These private engravers also design elongated coins for private clubs and organizations.

Elongated Coin collectibles are more commonly known as ECs. The first ECs in the United States were created in 1892-1893 at the World's Columbian Exposition (World's Fair) in Chicago, Illinois to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Columbus's discovery of America. At this event there were four elongated coin designs created and they can still be found today within the EC collectors community.

Where as the penny is the most popular coin used you can find all kinds of ECs made from many different items such as tokens, slugs, foreign coins, metal buttons, blanks, and quarters are just some of the popular items rolled today. There are also collector ECs that cost many thousands of dollars such as the $3.00 gold piece elongated coin pressed at 1893 World's Fair.

How did that little machine create the Elongated Coins?
EC collectibles are made when a coin, token, medal or blank planchets traveling through a machine called the jeweler's mill. The jeweler's mill has a designer image that is cut into steel rollers. Using immense pressure (about 20 tons), your coin is run between the steel rollers leaving a die impression imbedded into the coin. Simultaneously the jeweler's mill flattens and stretches the coin into an oval shape, resulting in imprinting your EC!

If you have ever been around a railroad track for a time you have placed a coin or two on the track and waited for the train to come by. When you went back to pickup your coin you found that most of the original design was gone and your coin had been smashed into a deformed shape.

At the 1901 Pan American Exposition in Buffalo, New York Charles Damm became well known as an elongated coin designer and engraver. Another well know EC designer was Frank Brazzel who died in the early 1990's but you can still find his collectible designs at some famous attractions. Today Jim Dundon and his son James of Florida are famous engravers of ECs and there collectible designs can be found across the country.

Elongated Coin Collectors
Collecting ECs is a fast growing hobby around the world and especially in the United States. The most collected EC of all time is The Lord's Prayer.

Early collectors may still be trying to obtain all the new ECs that are produced, but the majorities of modern collectors specialize in one or more fields and collect only those specific coins related to a specialized subject.

Walt Disney Collectible Elongated Coins
One of the popular specialized subjects is to collect all the Walt Disney World ECs. Once you locate your first Disney Collectible pressed coin machine, you will soon become aware that they're everywhere. Look for them by each attraction exit. There are hundreds of current and retired Disney collectible ECs. You can also find a Disney collectors EC book at most of the shops at Walt Disney World.

What other Elongated Coin themes do people collect?
Some of the collector themes are carousels, trains, zoos, state outlines, sports, dinosaurs, and just about any other subject you can think of. Have you ever thought about collecting all the EC pieces that refer to the space program, political souvenirs, Christmas, or Expositions? Some collectors even try collecting all the ECs created by a specific engraver. Check out your local bookstore for other EC collector books.

Is it Legal?
The United States Codes under Title 18, Chapter 17, and Section 331, "prohibits the mutilation, diminution and falsification of United States coinage." YES, it is very LEGAL to make elongated coins in the United States, Japan, South Africa and parts of Europe. The statute does not prohibit the mutilation of coins if the mutilated coins are not used fraudulently. You really do not want to create counterfeit coinage. Keep in mind that ECs are made mainly as collectible souvenirs, therefore mutilation for this purpose is legal.

What are Elongated Coins worth?
On the secondary market such as web sites and eBay you can find common ECs priced between 50 cents and a dollar. For new ECs the price goes up to $5 dollars. Specific and older ECs range in the thousands of dollars.

Keep in mind that the price depends on the number of impressions, the age, popularity of topic, the event, the metal used, the denomination of the coin, and the ECs condition. Higher prices are usually applied to limited edition, commemorative and no longer available ECs


The hard to find ECs can be found in coin shops, yard sales, flea markets, and even from your friends. You'd be surprised how many of your friends and relatives have a few ECs from the past, and will give them to you for your collection.

There's no wrong way to start an elongated coin collection.

Bruce Moran 

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