The Tagaki Tankless Water Heater, From a Plumber and Consumer Perspective

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Hi and welcome to another episode of "What's New in Plumbing." I had a talk today with Alan Urszuy the co-Director of A-1 Plumbing of Baltimore, and we chatted about some of the tankless water heaters on the market today. and specifically about the Tagaki tankless water heater.

The Tagaki is one of the oldest and most dependable models on the market. This trusty appliance has been around since the early 1950s. Tagaki provides models in many different sizes, from smaller units, made for residential use to their largest units which can be used for industrial applications.

Depending on the model, the Tagaki can supply anywhere from 200 to 500 gallons an hour. These specs prove that the unit is completely adequate for domestic hot water production, and consumer reports have indicated they can supply the needs of as many as ten people taking showers simultaneously in a home!

Modern Tagaki units are very energy efficient. The water is gas heated, and the newest condensation models are specially designed to utilize the heat of flue gases to further warm the water in the tanks. Because of acid residues in flue gas, the tanks are designed with a special corrosion resistant heat exchanger.

Consumer pros for the unit include eligibility for federal tax credit, energy efficiency, durability, (20 year lifespan), and power, one unit can supply the hot water needs for the whole house. Consumer cons include high installation costs, the need for experienced contractors and the "cold water sandwich effect." The cold water sandwich effect is seen in all the tankless heaters and occurs when the water is initially turned on and outputs hot water followed by a temporary drop in the water temperature.

Although it can take years of conventional use before annual energy savings makeup for the increased purchase and installation costs of the tankless heaters, the units can also be used as combination radiant heaters and hot water providers, and produce even larger savings.

The cost of converting a unit to dual use is only 100 dollars, a small fee when compared to the installation costs of an electric heat pump. Once installed, a unit can reduce home heating costs by an impressive 20-50% a year.

The dual heating system uses check valves that allow water to flow in one direction, as well as a tempering valve that drops the water temperature from 140°[F] for space heating to 120° for potable hot water." Water can flow through copper heating coils when needed for radiant heating, or be diverted to domestic use when demanded for that purpose.

According to Alan his customers who use the tankless heaters have been happy with the performance.

What's New in Plumbing is produced by A-1 Plumbing of Baltimore, an all purpose Baltimore plumbing companay, specializing in plumbing heating , in conjunction with Express Submit

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