Double Dog Bowl Feeder - Your Dog Needs One Of These

  • Print Article |
  • Send to a Friend |
  • |
  • Add to Google |

Making use of a double dog bowl feeder for a pet or animal can be a good way to go about making sure feeding occurs as needed. In our breakneck, fast-paced world, it's a sad fact that a beloved animal might not get the attention it deserves, on occasion. With these feeders, at least their food needs can be met.

All the good automatic units have a small cold storage capacity where a can or two of special food can be stored. This is for treat time or when dry food just won't do. A top-end unit will also be able to open and dispense food from those cans. Electronic controls are standard with most feeders, nowadays, and you can schedule feedings as needed. Also, up to ten pounds can be portioned at one time.

Putting a feeder together is a relative snap. Just follow the supplied easy-to-understand instruction manuals or guides. Sometimes, there's a CD-ROM, which has video "how tos" and other valuable tips. Also, most now have online websites you can go to, if you have a question or an observation about the feeder.

Almost all feeders on the market are built to handle one or two animals. You designate feeding and watering at various times throughout the day. Up to 8 periods can usually be tasked. Or you can limit it to just one, if you have a pet on a diet.

If you have a large or tall dog, or an animal with arthritis that prevents it from stooping over, you can buy a raised feeder. This is an ideal solution for a pet that prefers or needs its food in a bowl that's raised up higher than it would be if it were on the floor.

Almost all generally-available feeding units are built with the 15 to 40 pound animal in mind. You can also find specialty feeders if you have one larger than that, and you want to try automating feeding and watering. None of them are very hard to make use of, and they all portion food sizes with no difficulty.

Standard food holding capacity is about 1.5 gallons self-contained in a hopper or feeder of some sort. With a volume like that, you can expect to be able to put about 1.8 gallons of dry food within it, which it then allots in a safe and sensible manner. The good units also take care of watering, too, which is a plus.

Rate this Article:
  • Article Word Count: 403
  • |
  • Total Views: 23
  • |
  • permalink
  • Print Article |
  • Send to a Friend |
  • |
  • Add to Google |
>