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Buddhism is a religion and philosophy with between 230 and 500 million adherents worldwide, the vast majority living in Asia but with an increasing number in the West.

Delusion (moha) or Ignorance (avidyaa): Moha is one of the three bad roots that produce filthy awareness. It is always present in defiled mind. But it can be neutral like the other five in the category when it constitutes karmic retribution, as well as bad. It produces doubt and error. It is a residue in every feeling. It causes what is really frustrating, to be viewed as satisfying.
An alternative term for this factor is confidence (prasaada). Harivarman defines sraddhaa as concentration on content. Samghabhadra defines it as affection not involving attachment, thus not defiled.
If one understands meditation in a broad sense to include any level of concentration, including the minimal attention required of any intentional mental state above mere sensation.
The largest group of factors in Vasubandhu’s Abhidharmakosa constitutes the derived or concomitant types of awareness (caitta).
The largest group of factors in Vasubandhu’s Abhidharmakosa constitutes the derived or concomitant types of awareness (caitta).
The second category of factors relates to mind. In the Buddhist literature, it is referred to as awareness (jnaana), consciousness (vijnaana) and mind (manas).
The word Vasubandhu uses to denote ‘physical’ is ruupa, which itself breeds a problem. As everything in Buddhism is momentary, it is open to doubt whether the term ‘physical’ or ‘material’ has any scope at all. If any thing is to be material or physical, it is to be ‘something’. It is to persist in time, occupy space and provide resistance. But such things are ruled out under Buddhist assumptions.
The basic metaphysical concept in Abhidharma Buddhism is that of dharma, rendered in English as ‘factor’. In Buddhism, the entities of any sort that exist are fundamentally factors.
The beginnings of Abhidharma are found in certain fundamental listings of dharmas made by the Buddha, which were considered to be definitive and indisputable.
The Book of Discipline, Mahaavagga defines the principle of dharma reflected by the Buddha, after his enlightenment. ‘This dharma, won to by me, is deep, difficult to see, difficult to understand, peaceful, excellent, beyond dialectic, subtle, intelligible to the learned.’
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