How Do I Write A Good Fitness Sales Letter?

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"How do I write a good fitness salesletter?" is an inevitable question asked by just about anybody involved in personal training activities. This is just a fact of the fitness game, where marketing can be a matter of personal name recognition and growing that name in the eyes of a client base.

With that in mind, though, remember that all salesletters share many of the same components. The first thing to remember is that a good salesletter is about self-promotion. That means you're trying to promote the services you offer.

After all, you're calling yourself a "personal trainer." This means you're going to asking people to trust you on a personal level. Your business surely won't be nameless or faceless to your new customers, now will it?

Keep in mind that when you're trying to write an effective salesletter, it needs to focus more on prospective clients and their issues than on how great or wonderful you are. Copywriters experienced in this sort of marketing tend to call this the "ninety-ten rule." By that, it's meant that your letter needs to speak about customers ninety percent of the time and you only about ten percent of the time.

Focus the letter on their fitness problems and how you plan to help your new clients overcome them. Remember that until you start a one-on-one relationship with these people, they don't know you and they don't care about you. But they do care about themselves, so use that to your advantage.

The most valuable piece of direct marketing and self-promotion wisdom that's ever been developed is to ALWAYS offer prospective clients something of value. So, what to offer? There are a variety of things, when it comes to fitness.

Maybe a complimentary fitness training guide, or a small Ebook on diet and exercise. Most marketing experts say that about four to eight pages is long enough. If you can't write these, get a freelancer to do them. It won't cost all that much money.

This next piece of advice is invariably ignored by some eager-beaver fitness pro out there. Why is a question for psychologists, but it's a fact that some people forget that they should NEVER use formal letterhead when writing a fitness -- or any other -- salesletter. There are going to be times when it's important to increase your own name recognition. A salesletter isn't one of those times, though.

Don't forget that the goal of every salesletter should be to generate a response. Having letterhead all over the top of your salesletter distracts a possible client from the more important fact of your sales headline.

He or she should be concentrating on that and not on a fancy-looking address and title. If you feel you need to have it on the letter, put it down near the bottom, under the signature line. Better that you don't use it at all, though.

The last thing to add into an effective salesletter is to close it out speaking in an authoritative manner. Your objective in this sort of salesletter is to establish yourself as a professional in the mind of anybody reading it for your fitness center business plan. This means writing it in a manner that puts you on the same level as him or her.

Don't say something that asks a favor of a possible client. Instead say, "send for your free fitness guide right now." Not, "if you'd like a copy, feel free..." That sounds wishy-washy, for starters. Follow these simple techniques, and the question "how do I write a good fitness salesletter?" will no longer be of much importance in the future.

Sherman Goldberg is an expert author dedicated to bringing you great fitness marketing techniques for your fitness marketing and personal trainer marketing, and so much more which can be found at WWW.KickBackLife.com.

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