Walleye Fishing In The Springtime

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Wanna put some tasty Walleye on your dinner plate? Walleye fishing fans are gearing up for the spring Walleye by getting together their finest light fishing tackle with the lightest fishing line possible for this sketchy fish.

Where?

Early spring affords you a great opportunity for fishing Walleyes because they are so accessible. If there is late ice, the fish stay in the shallows for two to three weeks after their spawning process. They may possibly be found in just 3' to 4' of water.

When?

The most productive time to fish in early spring is during the warmest part of the day or in the evening. Throughout the daylight hours the warming water temperatures help the fish to be very active, however, nighttime can be very good because the fish are instinctively in a narrow band of water. Even if the fish are not biting there will be a good percentage of them that will react to bait.

Nighttime fishing for Walleye can take a little more practice. You may find it difficult unraveling a bird's nest from your baitcaster in the dark. A spincast fishing rod outfit is sure to be a hit because they don't have the tendency to cause this problem.

What Tackle?

It is important to use a 6' to 7' fishing rod that casts light baits effectively and it must be very sensitive. The lighter the fishing tackle the better is something to keep in mind when fishing for Walleye. You will want to use 4# to 6# test fishing line and a 1/16 oz jig so that he doesn't spit it out. The Walleye could possibly feel an 1/8 oz jig and will drop it as soon as he does. You will want to fish the 1/16 oz jig down to as deep as 15' of water. You might not be able to cover as much area because you will have to fish your jig slower but the Walleye will still pick it up and hold it in their mouths even if they are not feeding at the time.

What bait?

In early spring you will find that live baits such as minnows and artificial lures are both just as effective. In an early ice out or just after spawning, jigging seems to be the ultimate technique. Right after spawning their primary interest is looking for food and cover. Look for them around newly emerging weeds that they seek for cover.

No need to be too particular about jig color during this period; seems they are too interested in eating to pay much attention to the color of the jig. Using very light jigs also keeps you from getting hung up in the weeds as much. You may still want to bend the hook tip in a little bit to help get through the heavy weed cover.

Technique

Walleyes have a reputation for being spooked very easily. They are very sensitive to things such as light and noise. It helps if you can find them in the weeds because they feel more secure in this natural cover. If you are not getting bites then you will want to slow down your presentation and be sure you are using your smallest bait available. When approaching an area that you are sure holds fish, try to stay at least 25' away from where you will be fishing. You may want to use your anchor to slowly inch your way closer to the spot that you had previously found fish marked on your fish finder. Drifting is also a very effective technique for this type of fishing.

So what are you waiting for? No matter what time of day or night that you are reading this, the Walleye are waiting for you to catch them and turn them into a tasty meal this time of year. Go get em'!

For more great fishing tips, tricks and stories visit our fishing forum at My Tackle Space. A free blog and forum for fishermen of all walks of life. Join now and have your very own fishing page!

For great prices and and a wide selection of fishing electronics and boat electronics and gear please visit eFishBox.com

 

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