Apple Gets Malware In The Wild

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Adam O"Donnel at Zdnet.com commented back in December 2008 that the Mac OS will have malware (bad software), sooner or later. Well I don't know what you call sooner or later. I do know whatever you call it, it has arrived.

While the R&D engineer is a PhD, I don't think you need to be a rocket scientist to follow his thoughts. He said: "The reality is that mass market malware writers don't care about novel attack code anymore. They also don't care about who is running the most vulnerable services. They do care about writing programs that look like legitimate applications that will trick the end user into voluntarily installing them. When the bad guy's target is the human being at the console, then his only decision becomes what is the size of the target to go after."

Once again, it comes back to what the security folks call "social engineering". And once again, it worked. It turns out that pirated copies of iWork 2009 have bot net code.

Botnets are used to perform DDoS attacks on systems, gather sensitive
personal information, and send out a majority of the spam. The iServices has two variations, which are OSX.Trojan.iServices.A and OSX.Trojan.iServices.B
 
From a code standpoint, it's a devil of might. The two researchers from Symantec Mario Ballano Barcena and Alfredo Pesoli, state that the malware has peer-to-peer communication, remote start-up, and encryption capabilities.

Please understand I am not knocking OSX security that Apple has put in there. And if I agree on the screen, there is nothing the OS can do but comply.

Some time ago, over at GetCertify4Less.com, I said it would only be a matter of time before Apple got a serious malware infection. That is because the iPhone is a computer. A computer running OSX. Given anybody can buy an iPhone at Wal-Mart; it creates the market share for the bad guys to create a bot net (or other malware).

So what can we do? Two things. Stop responding to emails from people we don't know.  The bad guys are either trying to get you to go to an infected web site, or infect your computer with an attachment.

The second option is they are trying to sell you something. Anything from penny stocks in a ‘bump and dump' scheme (the actual company gets hurt as bad as the quick investor), to magic pills.

A recent study finds that spam emails use enough electricity to support 2.4 million homes a year. Until we collectively ‘wise up', and stop looking for some ‘easy out', the bot nets and spam will continue.

Tcat Houser is a trainer in Information Technology as well as assisting people understand the most complex computer all, the human brain. This necessitates his being a professional Road warrior.

As A Certified Technical Trainer and Subject Matter Expert (SME) @ TRCB.com it can be difficult to figure out what Tcat is currently researching.

See my lastest work at TRCBVideos.com - Convert Articles, Reviews into Videos Automagically.

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