The Enigma of the Irish Round Towers Part Two

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THE IRISH ROUND TOWERS - the key to an enigma. For more than forty years a top US scientist, Professor Philip Callahan has turned his mind to the enigma of the distinctive round towers of Ireland. His discovery, one of the most important this century, has huge implications for modern man. For these towers, built by monks in the 6th and 7th Centuries are no less than radio antennae.

Travelling in Ireland Callahan got to hear about the old healing ways - methods some scientists and medical minds are now re-evaluating. There is a scientific explanation, claims Callahan, to an ancient cure for mumps called the ‘Donkey' cure. "Our bodies are also affected by far infrared radio frequencies and the Ancient Celts were well attuned to these subtle forces of nature." They used their bodies as antennae. Until the 19th Century the inheritors of such wisdom in Ireland were the Booley people who spent all summer in the mountains grazing their cattle. Their closeness to nature gave some the gift of natural healing. Biddy Early, known as 'The Witch of County Clare' was one of them.

Biddy's cure for mumps was to put a donkey's halter over the neck of the patient, lead the patient to a stream running north-south and get him to drink from the water with his hands. He would then have to crawl three times under the belly of the donkey. An old wives' tale? Well the halter of a donkey was usually made of hemp, well doped with salts from the sweat of the animal. The halter looped around the neck thus forms a very efficient antenna. The weakly electrolytic water from the stream coating the inside of the throat is another antenna. The belly of a donkey emits huge amounts of far infrared in the 10 micrometre range, in fact far more energy than the best X-ray machine, proportionately, in the X-ray region. So the antennae narrowly focus the infrared energy through the swollen glands - a very effective cure.

"John Tyndall, the natural philosopher and friend of Michael Faraday, and Biddy Early lived at the same time. Tyndall's genius was that his low energy research explains and makes rational Biddy Early's low energy medicine."

Discovering the star map
Some years before, Callahan had bought Professor Barrow's Irish Heritage pamphlet on round towers which included a fine map of the still-standing towers. "I was lying on a couch looking at the map. There was something very familiar about it - apart from it being a map of Ireland! After about five or ten minutes, it suddenly flashed into my mind - insight I believe it is called - exactly why the map appeared so familiar. The towers formed a star map of the northern night sky. I have used that sky map dozens and dozens of times hiking around in the deserts of the world. It is gouged like a carved woodblock in my brain."

One of the best preserved monasteries is Clonmacnoise in the centre of the great plain of Ireland. It is on the Shannon River and is widely assumed to have been the centre for the entire monastic movement.

Callahan thought it logical to use it to represent the star Polaris. All the other star groups then fell in to place - Ursa Major, Draco, Cassiopeia, Camelopardalis and Lynx, far to the south.

What Callahan had drawn was an almost perfect sky for the December solstice. The imperfections in the round tower star plot lie mainly in the fact that the monks had to fix their towers to the lay of the land.

The constellations of the night sky at winter solstice beyond 45 degrees latitude.

The Round Towers of Ireland placed to match the night sky comstellations

In 2600 B.C., when the great pyramid of Giza was being built, the star Thuban would have been the pole star. About 13,000 years into the future the Earth will have wobbled to the point where Vega will be the pole star.

What is astonishing about the round tower star map of Ireland is that there were two great ecclesiastical centres during the early days of Christianity in Ireland, one at Armagh in the north and one at Clonmacnoise in central Ireland. In relation to the round tower plot of Draco, Armagh is exactly at the point of the ecliptic centre. This demonstrates very clearly that the Celtic monks of Ireland knew not only that the Earth was round, but also about precession - the slow wobble of the Earth around a theoretical or ecliptic centre of the sky, a circular movement which takes 25,800 years to complete.

It is probable that the knowledge of astronomy, and especially of precession and the ecliptic centre demonstrated in Ireland originated in Ancient Egypt. The Denderah circular zodiac (300 B.C.), for example, proves they too had this knowledge.

"The technocrat, who is high-energy, inorganic-slanted, will of course scoff at my star map of round towers and say that the correlation is coincidental," Callahan shrugs. "For the high-energy technocrat every phenomenon that does not hit one on the head with an inorganic hammer is a coincidence. Coincidence is the cop-out word of the century used to put low-energy organic researchers in their place."

to be continued...

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